Thelonious Monk – Les Liaisons Dangereuses 1960 – 200g – QRP

$53.00

A landmark discovery! Never-before released Thelonious Monk 1959 studio recording 200-gram LP, exclusive for Acoustic Sounds! Mastered by Kevin Gray at Cohearent Audio Plated and pressed at Quality Record Pressings! LP includes double photo insert "This long-lost soundtrack to Roger Vadim’s film of the same title (spread out on two CDs, with alternate takes) isn’t the best M...

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    A landmark discovery!

    Never-before released Thelonious Monk 1959 studio recording

    200-gram LP, exclusive for Acoustic Sounds!

    Mastered by Kevin Gray at Cohearent Audio

    Plated and pressed at Quality Record Pressings!

    LP includes double photo insert

    "This long-lost soundtrack to Roger Vadim’s film of the same title (spread out on two CDs, with alternate takes) isn’t the best Monk album from the period, but it’s not a mere novelty either. Monk’s piano work is drenched with playful energy, and the band—Charlie Rouse and Barney Wilen on tenor saxes, Sam Jones on bass, Art Taylor on drums—is in top form. * Bonus: The final track has Monk coaching Taylor through the drum part on 'Light Blue,' a fine illustration of the complexities of Monk’s music and how it comes out when the musicians get it down." — Fred Kaplan, Slate.com, December 2017

    Here is Thelonious Monk's only film musical score, never-before-released, for Roger Vadim's famed French film "Les Liaisons Dangereuses 1960." The soundtrack features Monk's 1959 all-star working band of Charlie Rouse, Sam Jones & Art Taylor, plus special guest French Saxophonist Barney Wilen.

    As AnalogPlanet.com's Michael Fremer writes, the movie wasn't well-received and it and Monk's music track all but disappeared until now. The session tapes were eventually discovered among the possessions of French promoter Marcel Romano, who died in 2007.

    Romano had previously paired Miles Davis with Louis Malle for his film "Ascenseur pour l'echafaud." After Roger Vadim named him music director for his new film, Romano and the director approached Monk, who though he'd had a musically exciting year (his famous Town Hall concert, the Riverside album 5 by Monk by 5 and a notable appearance at The Newport Jazz Festival), had a rough year, that included losing his cabaret card, which prevented him from performing live in New York City.

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