Dvorak – Violincello Concerto/Bruch – Kol Nidrei – Starker 200g 2LP 45RPM – QRP

$82.00

Janos Starker performs with the London Symphony Orchestra conducted by Antal Dorati performing Dvorak's Cello Concerto in B minor, Op. 104, and Bruch's Kol Nidrei The 2LP classic now mastered and pressed at 45 RPM! Cut directly from the original 3-track, first-generation master tapes! 45 RPM mastering enables full dynamics present on the master tapes! Mastered by Ryan K. Smith at Ste...

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    Janos Starker performs with the London Symphony Orchestra conducted by Antal Dorati performing Dvorak's Cello Concerto in B minor, Op. 104, and Bruch's Kol Nidrei

    The 2LP classic now mastered and pressed at 45 RPM!

    Cut directly from the original 3-track, first-generation master tapes!

    45 RPM mastering enables full dynamics present on the master tapes!

    Mastered by Ryan K. Smith at Sterling Sound using an AMPEX ATR-100 Tape Machine customized with 3-track flux magnetics heads

    Plated and pressed at Quality Record Pressings, makers of the world's finest-sounding LPs!

    These newly remastered Mercury Living Presence reissue LPs represent the state of the art of all-analog technology and production. Led by remastering supervisor Thomas Fine, son of high-fidelity recording pioneers C. Robert Fine and Wilma Cozart Fine of Fine Recording Inc. in New York City, these reissues were cut at 45 RPM directly from first-generation 3-track master tapes. A 3-2 channel mix was made directly to the cutting lathe, no "cutting master" tape stage, digital source or digital delay was used.

    Hungarian-American cellist János Starker epitomized refined elegance and superbly subtle bow work. Starker, who died in April 2013, was one of the 20th century's most renowned cellists. The Dvorak Cello Concerto and Bruch's Kol Nidrei were recorded July 6, 7 and 10, 1962 at Watford Town Hall outside London. Three Schoeps M210 microphones, set in omnidirectional pattern, were hung across the front of the orchestra, with the players positioned on the floor of the hall in order to best utilize its acoustics.

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